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Liquor Liability now the law in Rhode Island

Senate Bill 373 was introduced in March and would require any applicant or holder of a retail license for the sale of alcoholic beverages to file a certificate of insurance evidencing liability insurance coverage with certain minimum amounts. Later that month the Senate Judiciary Committee recommended passage of the bill and it was placed on the Senate calendar for reading and passage. The bill passed and went to House Corporations for consideration. The Corporations Committee recommended passage in concurrence. In late June the Corporations Committee recommended passage of the Sub A (amended version of the original bill) and it was placed on the House calendar where it passed. The Sub A version went to the Senate the following day and it passed in concurrence. The bill was finally submitted to the Governor for action and when the Governor took no action (sign or veto), the bill became effective. The bill creates a new section in Title 3, Section 7-39 – Liquor liability insurance. The new section establishes that any applicant or holder of a retail license for the sale of alcoholic beverages, with the exception of Class F1 licenses and licensees in Burrillville and North Providence, are required to supply a certificate of insurance for general liability, liquor liability and property damage in the minimum amount of $300,000. Failure to comply with the new law will mean revocation of the license. The new law goes into effect on August 1, 2017

Contact us today at (401) 726-3330 to see if you are required to have this insurance.

How To Protect Your Home from Water Damage

Water damage is one of the most common and costly disasters affecting U.S. residences, accounting for billions of dollars in losses to homeowners and renters annually. However, consumers can protect themselves with the right amount and type of insurance coverage.

Standard homeowners and renters insurance provides coverage for burst pipes, wind driven rain and damage resulting from ice dams on your roof. Some policies cover sewer and drain backups, but many do not; however, you can purchase a sewer backup rider to a homeowners or renters policy for approximately an additional $50 each year, with the policy limits varying depending upon the insurer.

Generally speaking, water that comes from the top down, such as rainfall, is covered by a standard homeowners insurance policy, while water that comes from the bottom up, such as an overflowing river, is covered by a separate flood insurance policy. Flood insurance can be purchased from the federal government’s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), and from some private insurers.
The average flood insurance policy costs $540 a year, according to the NFIP. For homeowners, the maximum amount of coverage available from the NFIP is $250,000 for damages to the home’s structure, and $100,000 for losses to its contents. There is a 30-day waiting period for a flood insurance policy to go into effect. For those who want coverage beyond the limits offered by an NFIP policy, excess flood insurance is available from a number of private insurance companies.
Properly maintaining a home is one of the best ways to prevent water damage.  A homeowner can prevent water seepage by painting water-sealant around the basement, and avert a sewer backup by installing and maintaining a backwater valve which allows sewage to go out, but not come back in.
The Institute for Business & Home Safety offers the following tips:

Inside Your Home

  • Inspect hoses and faucets. Check hoses leading to water heaters, dishwashers, washing machines and refrigerator icemakers annually. Replace those with cracks or leaks, and replace them all every five to seven years.
  • Inspect showers and tubs. Check the seal and caulking around showers and tubs to make sure they are watertight.
  • Shut off the water supply to the washing machine while away on vacation, and never leave the house while the washer or dishwasher is running.
  • Know the location of the main water shut off valve in your home. A damaged hose or a burst pipe can send water racing into your home. By knowing where this valve is located and how to shut off the main water supply, you can save yourself time and money.
  • Install an emergency pressure release valve in your plumbing system. This will protect against the increased pressure caused by freezing pipes and can help prevent your pipes from bursting.
  • Check pipes. Look closely for cracks and leaks and have the pipes repaired immediately.

Outside Your Home

  • Caulk and seal windows. Preventive maintenance will guard against water seepage.
  • Inspect your roof. Look for missing, damaged, and aging shingles.
  • Check your downspouts. Remove debris that may have accumulated in downspouts and rain gutters. Position downspouts so that they direct water away from the house.
  • Check sprinklers and irrigations systems. Be sure sprinklers and irrigation systems are not damaging the walls and foundations of the house; turn off and drain outside faucets to protect against frozen pipes.
  • Install gutter guards.Gutter guards are the device used to protect the clogging of the roof gutter so that the water from the roof may flow easily and accumulation of water does not take place on the roof but away from the house.

Holiday Happenings at GWB Insurance!

Over the past few weeks the staff at G.W.B. Insurance has gotten into the holiday spirit.  Also our staff has shown their charitable side by sponsoring a family through the Children’s Friend Foundation.   On behalf of all the staff members we wish all our customers and the community a Happy and Healthy Holiday Season!

 

 

MAPFRE Insurance Winter Billboard

Last winter was quite the season! Don’t let it get the best of you this year by preparing early! By now you’re probably well aware of ice dams and all the trouble they can cause. But just in case you aren’t, we wanted to make sure we spread the word on early winter preparation around ice dam prevention.

Follow the link below from our friends at Mapfre Insurance and don’t be left out in the cold!

http://insurance.mapfreusa.com/winter_billboard/

 

Holiday Happenings at GWB Insurance!

Blog Wreath  Toys for Tots

Over the past few weeks the staff at G.W.B. Insurance has gotten into the holiday spirit.  Also our staff has shown their charitable side by collecting toys and gifts for those families in need for the annual Toys for Tots program. We also were proud to sponsor a family through the Children’s Friend Foundation.   On behalf of all the staff members we wish all our customers and the community a Happy and Healthy Holiday Season!

Safe Boating Tips

 

No matter how much experience you have, it’s always a good idea for everyone to review boating safety rules before departures. Below you will find 10 basic boating safety tips to help you stay safe:Boating Safety

  1. Be Weather-Wise-Always check local weather conditions before departure; TV and radio forecasts can be a good source of information. If you notice darkening clouds, volatile and rough changing winds or sudden drops in temperature, play it safe by getting off the water.
  2. Follow a Pre-Departure ChecklistProper boating safety includes being prepared for any possibility on the water. Following a pre-departure checklist is the best way to make sure no boating safety rules or precautions have been overlooked or forgotten.
  3. Use Common SenseOne of the most important parts of boating safety is to use your common sense. This means operating at a safe speed at all times (especially in crowded areas), staying alert at all times and steering clear of large vessels and watercraft that can be restricted in their ability to stop or turn. Also, be respectful of buoys and other navigational aids, all of which have been placed there to ensure your own safety.
  4. Designate an Assistant SkipperMake sure more than one person on board is familiar with all aspects of your boat’s handling, operations, and general boating safety. If the primary navigator is injured or incapacitated in any way, it’s important to make sure someone else can follow the proper boating safety rules to get everyone else back to shore.

    5.Develop a Float Plan

    1. Whether you choose to inform a family member or staff at your local marina, always be sure to let someone else know your float plan. This should include where you’re going and how long you’re going to be gone.
    2. A float plan can include the following information:
    3. name, address, and phone number of trip leader
  • name and phone number of all passengers
  • boat type and registration information
  • trip itinerary
  • types of communication and signal equipment onboard
  • 6.  Make Proper Use of LifejacketsDid you know that the majority of drowning victims are the result of boaters not wearing their lifejackets? Make sure that your family and friends aren’t part of this statistic by assigning and fitting each member of your onboard team with a life jacket prior to departure. Wear it!

    7. Avoid Alcohol

    Practice boating safety at all times by saving the alcohol for later. The probability of being involved in a boating accident doubles when alcohol is involved and studies have shown that the effects of alcohol are exacerbated by sun and wind.

    8. Learn to Swim

    If you’re going to be in and around the water, proper boating safety includes knowing how to swim. Local organizations, such as the American Red Cross and others, offer training for all ages and abilities. Check to see what classes are offered in your area.

    9. Take a Boating Course

    Beginning boaters and experienced experts alike need to be familiar with the boating safety rules of operation. Boater education requirements vary by state; however, some require validated completion of at least one boating safety course. Regardless of your individual state’s requirements, it’s always important to be educated and prepared for every circumstance that might arise. You can learn boating safety rules by taking a local community course or online course to help educate yourself.

  • 10. Consider a Free Vessel Safety CheckTake advantage of a free vessel safety check from the US Coast Guard. They offer complimentary boat examinations to verify the presence and condition of certain safety equipment required by state and federal regulations. Free of charge, they’ll provide a specialist to check out your boat and make helpful boating safety tips and recommendations. They also offer virtual online safety checks as well.

 

Grilling Safety

Grill

Summers mean backyard grilling – safely!

 

Just like hamburgers and hot dogs, a sizzling grill is a symbol of summer and grilling isn’t just about great food. Backyard barbecues often create treasured memories with friends and family.

 

Keep in mind, however, that when you grill, you’re literally playing with fire. Thousands of residents each year learn this the hard way, suffering damage to their homes or even serious injuries in grilling accidents.

 

There’s good news, though: You can prevent grilling accidents by taking some simple precautions. The tips below can help ensure you cook only your burgers — and not your house — the next time you fire up the grill.

 

TIPS FOR ALL GRILLS

Your grill, whether gas or charcoal, should be on a level surface outdoors, away from anything that could be ignited by flames (bushes, fences, etc.).

NEVER use a grill indoors. Odorless carbon monoxide fumes could kill you.

Keep your grill clean and well-maintained. Check parts regularly to determine if replacements are needed.

Never leave a hot grill unattended or let children play near it.

 

CHARCOAL GRILL TIPS

From Kingsford.com

Do not add lighter fluid directly to hot coals. The flame could travel up the stream of fluid and burn you.

Never use gasoline or kerosene to light a charcoal fire.

Use flame-retardant mitts and long-handled barbecue tongs, as coals can reach up to 1,000 degrees.

To dispose of coals, allow the ashes to cool for at least 48 hours before disposal in a non-combustible container. If you cannot wait 48 hours, carefully place coals individually in a can of sand or bucket of water.

 

GAS GRILL TIPS

From the National Fire Protection Association

Check your grill’s hoses for leaks before using it for the first time each year. Apply a light soap and water solution to the hose. A propane leak will release bubbles. If you have a leak, and it will not stop after the grill and gas is turned off, call the fire department. If the leak stops when the grill and gas are turned off, have your grill serviced by a professional.

If you smell gas while cooking, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not move the grill.

Do not keep a filled propane tank in a hot car or trunk. When getting containers refilled, make that your last stop before going home.

Store propane tanks in an upright position, and never indoors.

 

From all of us at Gardiner, Whiteley and Boardman happy grilling, and stay safe this summer!